Protect Public Safety

THE PROBLEM: STATE RAIDS AND BORROWING JEOPARDIZE LAW ENFORCEMENT, FIRE PROTECTION, EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND OTHER VITAL PUBLIC SAFETY SERVICES.

Cities, counties and special districts provide the vast majority of law enforcement, fire protection, emergency response and public safety services in California.  In fact, on average, 65% of city discretionary budgets go to fund police and fire programs and services, and more than half of county discretionary budgets go to fund law enforcement, emergency medical and public health programs and services. That’s why California voters have overwhelmingly voted to stop State raids of local government funds – to protect funding for vital public safety services. Despite this, just last year the State passed a budget that borrowed and took billions of dollars in local government revenues. State raids of local funds jeopardize public safety services throughout the state and could mean:

  • Fewer police officers and sheriffs on the street
  • Fewer firefighters, paramedics and emergency medical personne
  • Longer response times
  •  Longer waits for 911 calls
  • Reduced traffic enforcement


PROP. 22 IS THE SOLUTION:  PROHIBIT THE STATE FROM RAIDING OR BORROWING LOCAL GOVERNMENT FUNDS VITAL TO PUBLIC SAFETY SERVICES.

Proposition 22, the Local Taxpayer, Public Safety and Transportation Protection Act, on the November 2010 statewide ballot, would:
 

  • Prohibit the State from taking, borrowing or redirecting local taxpayer funds dedicated to public safety, emergency response and other vital local government services. The tightly-written measure would close loopholes to prevent taking local taxpayer funds currently dedicated to cities, counties, special districts and redevelopment agencies. It would also revoke the State’s authority to borrow local government property tax funds.
  • Protect vital, dedicated transportation and public transit funds from State raids.  Prop. 22 would prohibit the State from redirecting, borrowing or taking the gasoline excise tax (HUTA) allocated to cities and counties for local street and road maintenance and improvements. The measure also prohibits the State from taking or redirecting public transportation account revenues dedicated to public transit.
     

 

Paid for by Yes on 22/Californians to Protect Local Taxpayers and Vital Services, a coalition of taxpayers, public safety, local government, transportation, business and labor, with major funding from the League of California Cities (non-public funds and CitiPAC) and the California Alliance for Jobs Rebuild California Committee
1121 L Street, #803 | Sacramento, CA 95814